Woman, priest, bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

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A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

The remains of three people discovered in the monastery, which is more than 800 years old, have finally found their real look.

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The skeletons of three people were discovered in a medieval crypt at Whithorn Monastery, Scotland, back in 1957. As it became known later, they belonged to an unknown woman, a local priest and abbot of the monastery – the bishop. After 65 years, scientists have been able to recreate the faces of these people using modern technology, writes Live Science.

Whithorn Monastery was founded in Scotland in the middle of the 12th century and is one of the earliest Christian communities in this country. This historic site is now run by The Whithorn Trust, a charitable organization that has decided to create a project to study the life of the inhabitants of Scotland in the Middle Ages.

Woman, priest, bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

 A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

The remains of three people were found in the crypt in this monastery, about which there is still little known. Research has shown that the skeletons belong to a young woman, a priest and a local bishop who became head of the local Christian community in the early 13th century.

As part of a project to study the life of the medieval population of Scotland, a digital reconstruction of the faces of three people was carried out. This reconstruction was done by anthropologist Chris Wrynn, who was the first to create 3D scans of each discovered skull.

A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)< /p>

A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

“I wanted to create the faces of real people, not just digital images. I made them to the maximum as alive as possible, even with the expression of some emotions,” says Rynn.

The scientist used the help of artificial intelligence to get the most realistic reconstructions of the faces of long-dead people. The result is images that are similar to photographs of living people.

“As for the skull of the priest, it seems that he had damage to the jaw, which may have been displayed on the lips. I tried to recreate this defect as accurately as possible,” — says Rynn.

A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from the 13th century (photo)

A woman, a priest, a bishop. Scientists have created a realistic reconstruction of the faces of people from 13 century (photo)

According to the anthropologist, the skull of the priest was the most asymmetrical skull with which he had to work. And the skull of a young woman, on the contrary, was the most symmetrical of those that fell into his hands.

see what people from our past were like,” says Julia Muir-Watt of The Whithorn Trust.

As Focus wrote, scientists have recreated the face of a Stone Age woman who lived more than 30,000 years ago on the territory of modern Czech Republic.